Saturday, March 7, 2015

MzTeachuh's Classroom: Women's History Month: Two Irish Mums Won the Nobe...

MzTeachuh's Classroom: Women's History Month: Two Irish Mums Won the Nobe...: The Peace People Rally, 1976, Ireland, Betty Williams and  Maireed Corrigan  'The Troubles' in Ireland are well know, conflict...

Women's History Month: Two Irish Mums Won the Nobel Peace Prize

The Peace People Rally, 1976, Ireland, Betty Williams and  Maireed Corrigan 

'The Troubles' in Ireland are well know, conflict between two demographics (Catholic and Protestant) that share the same religous root: Christianity. Its been going on since Cromwell. But a lesser known fact is that two Irish mums won the 1976 Nobel Peace Prize for beginning a Peace Movement in Northern Ireland to combat the carnage.

To quote the Nobel Committee in 1976: We admire Betty Williams and Mairead Corrigan for tackling so fearlessly the perilous task of leading the way into no-man's land, in the cause of peace and reconciliation.



Mairead (Corrigan) Maguire

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mairead_Maguire

'Gandhi taught that nonviolence does not mean passivity. No. It is the most daring, creative, and courageous way of living, and it is the only hope for our world. Nonviolence is an active way of life which always rejects violence and killing, and instead applies the force of love and truth as a means to transform conflict and the root causes of conflict. Nonviolence demands creativity. It pursues dialogue, seeks reconciliation, listens to the truth in our opponents, rejects militarism, and allows God's spirit to transform us socially and politically. '

 Maireed Corrigan Maquire 

Betty Williams 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betty_Williams_%28Nobel_laureate%29 


"That first week will always be remembered of course for something else besides the birth of the Peace People. For those most closely involved, the most powerful memory of that week was the death of a young republican and the deaths of three children struck by the dead man's car. A deep sense of frustration at the mindless stupidity of the continuing violence was already evident before the tragic events of that sunny afternoon of August 10, 1976. But the deaths of those four young people in one terrible moment of violence caused that frustration to explode, and create the possibility of a real peace movement...As far as we are concerned, every single death in the last eight years, and every death in every war that was ever fought represents life needlessly wasted, a mother's labour spurned."

Betty Williams

MzTeachuh's Classroom: Vincent, Not Wandering Lonely As A Cloud

MzTeachuh's Classroom: Vincent, Not Wandering Lonely As A Cloud: Vincent Willem van Gogh, Dutch, 1853 ‑ 1890. Oil on canvas, 19 1/2 x 39 1/4 inches (49.5 x 99.7 cm). Cincinnati Art Museum, Bequest of ...

Vincent, Not Wandering Lonely As A Cloud


Vincent Willem van Gogh, Dutch, 1853 ‑ 1890. Oil on canvas, 19 1/2 x 39 1/4 inches (49.5 x 99.7 cm). Cincinnati Art Museum, Bequest of Mary E. Johnston
Daffodil dawn this morning at my home.
Daffodils are starting to blossom in my part of the world, and always remind me of Wordsworth's famous poem, 'Daffodils,' also called, 'I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud.' It is the narrative of an introspective poet taking a countryside hike and as he walks over a slight hill, encounters the serendipity of thousands of daffodils.

Vincent illustrates a similar encounter with a couple. Love the warmth of Van Gogh.


 I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud
 

By William Wordsworth 


 I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.



Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.



The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed—and gazed—but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:



For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils. 
Check out the excellent resource that is the Poetry Foundation-- and maybe introduce a 'Poem of the Week,'  which is the quickest way to get to the top Bloom's Taxonomy.
 

MzTeachuh's Classroom: ePLNs for Teachers –Getting Connected

MzTeachuh's Classroom: ePLNs for Teachers –Getting Connected: Teachers can find professional networking  online.  Educational sites afford convenience, privacy, and expertise in a variety of educat...

ePLNs for Teachers –Getting Connected



Teachers can find professional networking  online.  Educational sites afford convenience, privacy, and expertise in a variety of educational areas. There are also interactive activities for teachers joining an online community. Here are a few advantages to connecting online:



·         Current educational topics discussed by experts and educators in a timely, thorough manner.  For example, the latest input on educational technology use in the class, special education innovations, and school-wide interventions such as social and emotional interventions are hot topics currently inspiring teachers in their professional pursuits.



·         Convenience and privacy comes with networking online. Professional development is generally limited to scheduled on-campus staff or team meetings, conferences, or District trainings. A teacher may have a question or comment on a topic with no opportunity during these gatherings, or the teacher feels the question or comment is too basic or too sophisticated for the discussion. Educational sites can provide a responsive venue through articles, group discussions, webcasts, videos or a search by a teacher using key words at the teacher’s convenience.



·         Opportunities to investigate new teaching areas and/or extend teaching expertise abound through sites that are specific to educational technology, special education, or improved teaching methods. A teacher may want more information about learning disabilities, for personal or professional reasons, and find helpful information and professionals online.  Maybe a video demonstrating a specific lesson would be very helpful. There is an abundance of sites to enhance a teacher’s knowledge and methods.

Here are well-established educational sites excellent for teacher connections.





http://www.edutopia.org/

 Edutopia This is an attractive, vast website that is has numerous educational topics: experts and educators writing articles, groups to join, videos, classroom guides.  Edutopia is a great support for teachers.







https://www.teachingchannel.org/
The Teaching Channel  provides specific video demonstrations in K-12 classrooms and lesson plan points on basic curriculum areas, as well as information on implementing the Common Core.  There are also articles and blogs. The Teaching Channel provides a ‘Teaching Team’ feature for professional development.







http://www.ncld.org/
The National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD) This site offers connections for parents and teachers in the complex, challenging area of Special Education. There is a diversity of articles that are thorough, clear, and understandable for those not trained in Special Education.  The site offers ebooks, podcasts, videos and current news about the IEP process, IDEA, funding, and interventions. NCLD is a tremendous asset for teachers and parents.





http://www.edudemic.com/

Edudemic is a clear, concise, and thorough guide to educational technology, blended and flipped learning, and educational innovation using technology. There are many guidelines on a wide variety of topics that a teacher may not even have enough background in ed tech to ask about. For a teacher wishing to deepen knowledge of ed tech, or a beginner hoping to catch up--Edudemic is very effective.

MzTeachuh's Classroom: IEP Meeting? Do I Have To Go?

MzTeachuh's Classroom: IEP Meeting? Do I Have To Go?: That confusing enough for you? Am I required to attend IEP meetings if I am not a Special Education teacher?   I've been a...

IEP Meeting? Do I Have To Go?



That confusing enough for you?
Am I required to attend IEP meetings if I am not a Special Education teacher?
 
I've been asked that more than once as the Special Education teacher, and especially as a Resource Specialist, also known as Special Academic Instructor. The answer in our state is that at  least one general education teacher who has the student on his/her caseload needs attend any IEP (Individualized Education Program) whether it be qualifying (evaluating to see if the student will enter Special Education), annual (the once a year assessment), triennial (every third year the educational psychologist also assesses), or an addendum which is called for a unique reason at any time. However, the better school sites have the entire teaching team there. The teachers at my middle school were very dedicated (and wanted to keep their positions) and supported the Special Ed. kids very effectively with attendance.

What should I bring to the IEP as the General Education teacher?

1.  Bring a calm and caring attitude. Parents are always concerned about their kid. Even if you as the classroom instructor have concerns, even serious ones, about the child performance or behavior, a general education teacher must show a caring attitude and a calm demeanor. Even if you must fly out of the meeting at the speed of heat to finish your day's responsibilities--you are so very important to that parent and child that every bit of body language as well as spoken words means the world, and focusing on the positive will get things done better.

2. Bring your expertise and evidence of it.  All teachers have grade books (on-line or otherwise), lesson plans, records of phone calls and communication to the parent, and copies of referrals and time-outs. Just be ready with this information and how to explain the ebb and flow of your classroom. Please have some positive comments to show you know little Johnny and how well he demonstrates a skill, reveals a talent or interest, or did something right in class. If little Janie is lacking, the parent should already have communicated with you because you called, or sent information home. The Special Education teacher should already know, too, if this is a big deal (actually, even a little deal.) The team of teachers plus family can really make it happen for a kid, and communication with coordination is the key.

How Should I Interact At The Meeting?

3. Be ready to explain your testing and grading system, including homework. The child's future hinges on what you do, how you grade, and do you offer help. The parent needs to know how you grade. Is there make up work? A Special Education student usually is not an independent learner, even if they have the intelligence, because of a visual or auditory learning handicap. Do you offer homework help? Test retakes? Tutoring? When and where? The Math Department at my last school was remarkable in the regular, systematic help for all kids. And it got results.

I Don't Feel Prepared For This--What Should I Do?

4. Coordinate with the Special Education teacher. I cannot adequately explain how complex, detailed and mind-boggingly intense all this Special Ed. stuff is. But it is to your advantage as a general education teacher to share information with the RSP or SAI teacher. Most Special Ed. teachers are type B personalities (myself included) and won't bully or force anyone to do anything. But there is such expertise there, one suggestion may change a classroom situation for the better. And frequently there are Behavior Plans to implement for a rascal. The teaching team wants to keep this side of legalities, having i's dotted and t's crossed. Of course, first and foremost, we want to help the kids. A Special Education teacher has district personnel resources and knowledge that can really help.

MzTeachuh's Classroom: Don't Like Poetry? Betcha Do

MzTeachuh's Classroom: Don't Like Poetry? Betcha Do: ...don't forget all those Valentine's rhymes!  You say you don't like poetry--I doubt that. We just have to establ...

Don't Like Poetry? Betcha Do

...don't forget all those Valentine's rhymes!


 You say you don't like poetry--I doubt that. We just have to establish what we mean by poetry.

Yes, you enjoyed a movie that is all poetry.
That come-on line is nothing but poetry.

Romeo + Juliet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romeo_%2B_Juliet 

 

The Cat in the Hat--even my name is poetry.

 

You can't say you never liked Dr. Seuss--what's that--you forgot it was poetry?

The Cat in the Hat

http://www.seussville.com/books/book_detail.php?isbn=9780394800011 

     

Betting you have quoted poetry, though maybe not all at once.

Tis better to have loved and lost/Than never to have loved at all  Tennyson To err is human; to forgive, divine  Alexander Pope  A thing of beauty is a joy forever  Keats And miles to go before I sleep  Robert Frost Hope springs eternal in the human breast  Alexander Pope To be or not to be: that is the question Shakespeare I know why the caged bird sings Maya Angelou O Romeo, Romeo; wherefore art thou Romeo Shakespeare...there's no joy in Mudville, the mighty Casey has struck out. Thayer

You probably chuckled at the Limerick about the girl from Venus, but I won't print that since this is a family edublog. But this poem  might make you smile, especially noting the poet.

The marriage of poor Kim Kardashian
Was krushed like a kar in a krashian.
Her Kris kried, "Not fair!
Why kan't I keep my share?"
But Kardashian fell klean outa fashian.
—Salman Rushdie 


Maybe you didn't realize you were accessing poetry during spiritual moments. The Psalms are poems, like the most quoted Psalm 23.
Lena Moore Psalm 23 Quilt ca. 1930 Collection of Janet M. Green "Talking Quilts" American Folk Art Museum
Remember when you were in ninth grade and you kind of liked that wild story with the Greek guy and all the monsters like the Cyclops and the crazy-haired Medusa? 

That was poetry, thanks to Homer, not Simpson. The Odyssey by Homer.
Cyclops AKA Claymation

Achilles AKA Brad Pitt.

 And don't forget Achilles, not the heel. The Illiad (and the story of Troy) was  a poem, too.

 Speaking of Homer Simpson, here is my last evidentiary item. You enjoyed "The Raven: the Simpson's Version." I know you did. Though they did a really Poe job of it. (Ha, English major joke.)

The Raven: The Simpsons Version

http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=251203 

Poetry...you like poetry. Told ya so.

MzTeachuh's Classroom: Five Poems to Soothe Kids' Toxic Stress

MzTeachuh's Classroom: Five Poems to Soothe Kids' Toxic Stress: Grandpa was really sick now, thin like a skeleton. The last thing I remember him saying was, "Did you bring the little dog?" We h...

Five Poems to Soothe Kids' Toxic Stress

Grandpa was really sick now, thin like a skeleton. The last thing I remember him saying was, "Did you bring the little dog?" We hadn't brought Kip because Grandpa was in a hospice, but the pain-killers made him think he saw the chihuahua at the foot of the bed.  Kip had been a faithful friend stationed at the foot of his bed the previous five years at home when Grandpa was bedridden due to cancer.


Technically, Grandpa wasn't our 'real' grandfather. He was our grandmother's second husband. But to me, my sister, and all the many cousins, he was the best grandpa in the whole world. Everyone says that, even almost fifty years later. He loved children. He loved us. He spent time talking to us, taking us on walks, teaching us to play the card game 'Casino.' And card tricks, too. All the photos with him showed everyone smiling. He was like that.



I recall watching baseball on television with him. He was a San Francisco Giants' fan. I realized last year that the reason I knew so much about the Giants was because I watched the World Series (1963) with him (the last baseball season Grandpa was at home), before he passed away the following spring. His going left a dark hole in the family.



Literature can ease the stress of a child's serious loss, so the effect doesn't advance to toxic, chronic stress. Literature draws the isolating pain out in the open. We aren't alone in our experiences; universal themes speak to our human condition, too. For me, I somehow found  "The Rainy Day," by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, probably in my parochial school library. It soothed my heartbroken, adolescent soul with lines like "Behind the clouds is the sun still shining" and "Into each life some rain must fall, Some days must be dark and dreary."  Henry knew how I felt. http://www.americanpoems.com/poets/longfellow/12207 




Childhood can be filled with fears, even terrors, real and imagined. We don't need to describe the traumas kids suffer. Maya Angelou's "Life Doesn't Frighten Me," infers a child's nightmares and possible real terrors;  the voice in the poem stands up to her fears. A group discussion of a poem allows a student to absorb the comfort at her own pace and need; she can share her fear or not. But the universal experience of fear is acknowledged. http://www.swaraj.org/shikshantar/life_mayaangelou.htm



Kids can be demeaned, betrayed, bullied. How can a kid handle that? Students, usually middle-schoolers, respond with shock at the opening lines of
                                            I'm nobody! Who are you?
                                            Are you nobody, too?



Someone else knows how it feels? I'm not the only one going through this? When you're born into the caste of the rejects--what's a kid to do? Like Emily Dickinson suggests, reject the insult--its the conformists who are to be ridiculed.  To read how the totally unique Emily
suggests we do this, go to this link and see all the poem. http://www.online-literature.com/dickinson/448/



Every year I have taught in Southern California, I have students that have had traumatic losses due to violence close to them. Even what we consider to be a cliche can comfort them. Famous sayings and poems aren't famous to kids--its new material.  The well known saying from Tennyson's "In Memoriam" is still valid:

                      

                                           I hold it true, whate'er befall;

                                           I feel it, when I sorrow most;

                                           'Tis better to have loved and lost

                                           Than never to have loved at all.

For the rest of the poem, 

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/174603. I always liked the reference to not wanting to be a 'linnet' (caged bird) that was never free to experience 'the summer wood.' Life has joys and sorrows, and we fly to the first despite the eventual descent into the second. 



Our people, our family can uphold us.  http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/177021 Langston Hughes' "Mother to Son" speaks a mom's heart. Life's exertion, exhaustion, and unexpected reversals require relentless effort to overcome, often too much for the young  person by himself. Whether its a mother to son, grandpa to granddaughter, teacher to student---there are grown-ups reaching out to you. Someone cares. We can navigate you, one step at a time, past the hidden trip-ups. We know where they are-- we've tripped over a few--but let's get up and keep on climbing.



The comfort from the community;  poets from even two hundred years ago can be a member of that community. A poem can embrace the sad, frightened, lonely soul of a child.

I thought of Grandpa when his Giants won the Series. I couldn't share it with him, except in my heart. That's a comforting thought. I learned it from poetry.

MzTeachuh's Classroom: Got Equity?

MzTeachuh's Classroom: Got Equity?: Education Activism Begins With Teachers http://www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2014/08/20/fp-healy-newteacher.html?cmp=SOC-EDIT-GOO&utm_...

Got Equity?

Education Activism Begins With Teachers

http://www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2014/08/20/fp-healy-newteacher.html?cmp=SOC-EDIT-GOO&utm_content=buffer3f78e&utm_medium=social&utm_source=plus.google.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Making Connections: Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/making-connections-culturally-responsive-teaching-and-brain-elena-aguilar#comment-177376 

Is America Ready to Talk About Equity in Education?

http://neatoday.org/2013/05/28/is-america-ready-to-talk-about-equity-in-education-2/ 

Classroom Diversity & Academic Success

http://www.education.com/topic/diversity-in-education/ 

Leading Public Education Organizations Lack Diversity at Top, Report Finds

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/District_Dossier/2014/12/report_leading_public_educatio.html?cmp=SOC-EDIT-GOO&utm_content=buffer4a6eb&utm_medium=social&utm_source=plus.google.com&utm_campaign=buffer 

Richard Culatta: Five Ways Technology Can Close Equity Gaps

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/marketplacek12/2014/11/richard_culatta_five_ways_technology_can_close_equity_gaps.html?cmp=SOC-EDIT-GOO&utm_content=bufferc02a3&utm_medium=social&utm_source=plus.google.com&utm_campaign=buffer 

7 Strategies To Support Students Who Can’t Afford Technology

http://www.teachthought.com/technology/5-strategies-support-students-cant-afford-technology/